About 84% of Asian Consumers Weigh up Product Labels to Pick Products with Natural Ingredients Finds Survey


GNT Group, a company that specializes in natural-ingredient-based food color, recently conducted a survey to understand the label-reading behavior of consumers across the world. The survey threw up a surprising finding: Asian consumers are more likely to weigh up product labels as compared to their American counterparts. But what doesn’t come as a surprise is the revelation that consumers more likely to add clean-label products to their shopping carts.

It is amply clear from the survey that consumers all across the world are paying more attention to food labels and are weighing their options before deciding on a final purchase. The survey found that in Europe, about 50% consumers read labels closely, whereas in the United States, the number stands at 64%. Asia, ostensibly, has the most conscious consumers, with 84% saying that they read food labels closely before buying a product.

As part of the survey, the company reached out to over 5,000 consumers, across 10 countries in the following regions: the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Questions asked in the survey largely pertained to the eating and food shopping habits of consumers.

From the global standpoint, about 68% consumers said that they read labels to make a healthier eating choice – this, however, depended on whether such information was readily available via the labels. However, in China, Thailand, and Indonesia, this applied to 73% of respondents.

Of all global consumers that read food product labels, about two-thirds said that they would reject a particular product based on attributes such as synthetic food color. However, in Asia, the same number was seen at an impressive 74%. 

The results of the survey reveal that in consumers’ opinion, natural food color and the ‘naturalness’ of ingredients used in food products is a crucial aspect. Among other findings, the survey also saw that for many consumers, grocery shopping is a leisure activity rather than an ‘annoying activity.’

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