Supportive Government Policy Frameworks to Boost Adoption of Wave and Tidal Energy Power Plants

The ocean can prove to be one of the largest reserves of clean, sustainable energy thanks to more efficient ways of harnessing wave and tidal energy. Since wave and tidal power plants are still a relatively new technology, they provide ample scope for growth or development. These power plants enable power generation even in remote locations where grid connections are not feasible. The global wave and tidal energy market also receives strong support by governments worldwide. Several countries now have well-defined government policy frameworks and incentive schemes that encourage the adoption of these power plants.

According to a report published by Transparency Market Research (TMR), the global wave and tidal energy market was valued at US$497.7 mn in 2014 and is projected to reach US$11,345.0 mn by 2024, expanding at a whopping CAGR of 23.2% between 2016 and 2024.

TMR analysts address three important questions that companies operating in the wave and tidal energy market have:

Q. Which regions will hold lucrative opportunities in the market?

Major developments in wave and tidal stream plants are expected to occur in Europe. South Korea is expected to witness massive growth in terms of tidal barrage operations. Wave energy development will be high in Australia in the Asia Pacific region. Commercialization of this technology to its fullest extent is expected to create a huge scope for growth in the market. 


Q. What are the challenges hampering the adoption of wave and tidal power plants?

The high capital investment required for the infrastructure and installment of wave and tidal power plants is a major problem. The low maturity of this technology is another major factor dampening the lack of deployment of wave and tidal power plants.

A lack of funding channels is also impeding the market’s growth. A case in point would be Pelamis Wave Power Ltd. The company failed to secure the funding required for the development of wave energy technology in November 2014, as per reports. The company which developed P1, the world’s first offshore wave power converter to generate electricity into a national grid, is unable to further develop their product owing to insufficient funds.

Q. What are the recent developments in the global wave and tidal energy market?

Aquamarine Power Ltd. and the National University of Ireland, Maynooth have collectively secured an €800,000 EU Horizon 2020 grant to improve the performance of Oyster, a wave energy converter. The new program will enable researchers to explore ways to optimize the energy capture and the economic performance of Oyester, which is developed by Aquamarine Power.

In July 2016, wave energy developer Carnegie Wave Energy Limited announced the successful commissioning and deployment of a wave monitoring buoy in the South coast of Mauritius. Atlantis, a company based in Singapore, has entered into an agreement with SBS Intl Ltd. for the development of a 150MW tidal stream site in Indonesia. The plant is expected to be the first commercial scale tidal array in South East Asia.

Such successful deployments of wave and tidal stream plants are expected to continue to ensure the growth of the market and increase the deployment of these plants. 

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